[Ml-stat-talks] Fwd: This Friday in the Political Methodology Seminar: Martin Lindquist (Johns Hopkins University, Department of Statistics) - "Functional Causal Mediation Analysis with an Application to Brain Connectivity"

Kosuke Imai kimai at Princeton.Edu
Mon Feb 9 13:56:15 EST 2015


This talk may be of interest to some of you.

Best,
Kosuke

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Kosuke Imai               Office: Corwin Hall 036
Professor                 Phone: 609-258-6601
Department of Politics    Fax: 609-258-1110
Princeton University      Email: kimai at Princeton.Edu
Princeton, NJ 08544-1012  http://imai.princeton.edu
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---------- Forwarded message ----------
From: Benjamin H. Fifield <bfifield at princeton.edu>
Date: Mon, Feb 9, 2015 at 1:39 PM
Subject: This Friday in the Political Methodology Seminar: Martin Lindquist
(Johns Hopkins University, Department of Statistics) - "Functional Causal
Mediation Analysis with an Application to Brain Connectivity"
To: polmeth at princeton.edu


 Hi everyone,

 This Friday, on February 13th, Professor Martin Lindquist (Johns Hopkins
University, Department of Biostatistics) will be presenting his talk titled
"Functional Causal Mediation Analysis with an Application to Brain
Connectivity" in the Political Methodology Seminar.  The talk's abstract is:

 "Mediation analysis is often used in the behavioral sciences to
investigate the role of intermediate variables that lie on the causal path
between a randomized treatment and an outcome variable. Typically,
mediation is assessed using structural equation models (SEMs) with model
coefficients interpreted as effects. In this paper we present an extension
of SEMs to the functional data analysis (FDA) setting that allows the
mediating variable to be a continuous function rather than a single scalar
measure, thus providing the opportunity to study the functional effects of
the mediator on the outcome. We provide sufficient conditions for
identifying the average causal effects of the functional mediators using
the extended SEM. The method is applied to data from a functional magnetic
resonance imaging (fMRI) study of thermal pain that sought to determine
whether activation in certain brain regions mediated the effect of applied
temperature on self-reported pain."

 An associated paper and the seminar's calendar can be found at:
http://q-aps.princeton.edu/book/political-methodology-research-seminar. We
will be meeting at noon on Friday in Corwin 127. Lunch will be served.

 Best,

 Ben

  --------------------
Ben Fifield
Ph.D Candidate
Department of Politics
Princeton University
203-858-9407
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